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It Took A Long Time, But She Did It Her Way

Posted By David Ziobro, Tuesday, August 23, 2016


This blog post is a reprint of an earlier piece. Click here for the original post.

"Well, at least they went quickly and didn’t suffer.” That’s what people say when someone dies. I understand what they mean. But she didn’t go quickly. No, it was a long slow steady decline. Did she suffer? No, with the pain meds, and her loss of memory, she didn’t suffer, but I did. 

When we were told that the cancer had spread to her brain, the clock started to tick. Life went on as much as it could. She was able to do some of the things she enjoyed like reading, crafts, and needlepoint. In time, those activities became impossible, and TV and the two hours a day with her aide became her life. Our aide was a friendly young woman; they would sit and talk about all kinds of things, and they liked to look at our photo albums. Our aide was planning a trip to Disney World, and my wife really enjoyed helping her plan it. The trip ended up being scheduled the week after my wife passed away. Her aide was not able to attend the viewing or the funeral. It was almost like my wife planned it that way. 

As time passed, we entered the beginning-of-the-end dates. When we were given the diagnosis, the doctor simply would not give us a time frame. The internet however gives you lots of information--we were looking at a 16 month time frame, give or take. I was finally able to get the doctors and the hospice nurses to give me a better idea after many conversations. They were all given with reluctance, and usually accompanied by "everyone’s situation is different.” When we hit the beginning of the possible time frame, it got interesting. By this point I had taken the 90 day FMLA leave from work, and I ended up taking another 90 day leave of absence as well.As with most everything in her life, my wife exceeded expectations: she lasted 23 months.


During the final 6 months of her life, we were in the "anytime” zone. Every morning was difficult for me. Was today the day? Remember when you had your first child and, inexperienced and fearful, you would walk into their room at night and listen for them breathing? Well there I was, going into her room in the morning wondering if this would be the day. I would hope upon opening the door she would move in some way so I would know right away. When she didn't I would walk up slowly and listen, a mixture of fear and then relief, followed by disappointment and then guilt. I had six months of that.

In the last year, my wife’s mental capacity diminished to the point where we could no longer really converse. We still talked, but I understood that she was not there, and our conversation would be forgotten as quickly as it started.


The good part was that she was totally unaware of her situation. She knew she was sick, but figured she’d get better and return to work soon. My wife had retired from her position as an elementary music teacher four years earlier. She began to ask about school and I would explain that she had retired. "Oh really, when did that happen…I don’t remember.” We would talk and it would be forgotten. Every night we would go through the routine about how she was retired.


Each morning, we were up early and would go through the same conversation. I had to move her car to her mother’s house around the corner for fear that she would just jump in and drive away. She had not driven since her diagnosis in 2009. Then we had to hide the car keys for all our other cars. Notes on the mirror, on the door, nothing seemed to help. Sometimes she would call the school and arrange to get a sub. The administrative assistant, who knew my wife well, would handle these phone calls with patient understanding. It turns out she enjoyed just talking to her. The rest of the staff were also amazing; they understood and dealt with it. 

Every morning was difficult for me. Was today the day? So when someone says, "well, at least they went quickly and didn't suffer,” understand what suffering is. There are all kinds of suffering. My wife passed away 23 years after her diagnosis of breast cancer. She did better than expected, and did things her way. She once told me "I’m a difficult patient, I know that. It’s my life and I want to know what is going on. I don’t care if they think I’m a bad patient.”


In reality, according to her doctor, she was a good patient. He understood why she was the way she was. When she passed, her doctor told me what a strong person she was. He also told me what a fantastic job I did in taking care of her. I tried the best I could. It was difficult. Her doctor gave me a big hug when he told me that. Men don’t hug usually. It was so special because it gave me the feeling that I did good. The patient is the one being treated; the well spouse is often forgotten. He was telling me I was not forgotten. That was special.


Dave Ziobro, Former Well Spouse

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