Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Your Cart   |   Sign In
Families and Health
Blog Home All Blogs
Search all posts for:   

 

View all (167) posts »
 

The Health Paradox within Marriage

Posted By Jeremy Yorgason, Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Health problems are generally seen as a stressor to those in committed, couple relationships. That is, when a partner becomes ill, it often puts a strain on the relationship through the ill partner (a) not being able to perform the same level of household chores, (b) losing time at work/earning money, (c) having to pay for doctor bills and prescriptions, (d) having less positive or increased negative mood, and (e) having fewer positive and more negative couple interactions. These stressors associated with poor health within couple relationships have been established in the research literature.

At the same time, there are a number of studies that have indicated paradoxical outcomes within couple relationships in the context of illness. For example, research has shown that some couples suggest that their relationship has become closer in ways because of one partner having diabetes, hearing loss, a disability, or arthritis symptoms. So which is the right answer? Does illness strain couple relationships, does it bring partners closer together, or can couples expect both strain and closeness? The answer may depend on how we view illness.


Our perceptions of illness provide the lens through which we see health challenges. From a health STRESSOR perspective, illness can present difficult challenges for individuals and couples. From a RESILIENCE perspective, some people are strengthened in their relationships when faced with illness challenges. In fact, some couples’ relationships may be stronger than they would have been had they not faced a health challenge together and bonded through that adversity.

Given that not all people respond to illness or health stressors the same way, and that some couples apparently develop stronger relationships through health adversities, what factors might more readily lead to "paradoxical” or beneficial results? Research suggests the following factors likely benefit couples:

- Having a strong marriage relationship prior to illness onset
- Communicating openly about health challenges
- Having empathy for an ailing spouse
- Having resources that can be tapped such as social support and appropriate medical care

Other studies suggest that being over-controlling and overprotective as a caregiving partner has detrimental effects.

Relationship resilience is possible among all couplesThere is so much more that we can learn about the bi-directional relationship between health and couple relationships. Future research ideas include examining partner flexibility in future life planning, relationship history of overcoming past challenges together, and whether healthy partners choose at some point during an illness to be committed to their relationship, to their partner, and to working through whatever may come regardless of the outcome. In short, the mechanisms of health challenges linked with stronger couple relationships are largely unknown.

From a clinical perspective, relationship resilience is possible among all couples wherein one partner or both are faced with health challenges. At the same time, the reality is that health problems are nearly always a stressor on couples. Perhaps the acknowledgement of stress with the willingness to pursue resilience in response to health challenges will provide hope and courage to struggling couples. Perhaps even relationships that are "on the rocks” or experiencing a pile-up of stressors can emerge stronger when faced with health challenges. Clinicians might specifically encourage couples to:

- Communicate regularly about the health problems, and the difficult decisions and topics they may face
- See themselves as collaborators in facing illness, rather than as being alone in the process
- Consider the illness as not being part of the ill person’s identity or the identity of the couple relationship 
- Discuss what is helpful support, and what, if any, types of support might feel overinvolved or controlling to the ill partner
- Try to balance autonomy in the patient, while allowing appropriate dependence or interdependence between partners

Hopefully with the encouragement of healthcare professionals more couples facing serious illness will experience the health paradox within marriage.


Dr. Jeremy Yorgason is an Associate Professor and Director of the Family Studies Center within the School of Family Life at Brigham Young University. He is also a licensed marriage and family therapist in the State of Utah. His research is focused on marriage health in later life, with an emphasis on how couples manage chronic health conditions. His research often involves daily diary surveys as well as information from both spouses in the relationship. He has studied couple relationships in context of various health concerns including osteoarthritis, acquired hearing impairment, diabetes, arthritis, disability, and declines in self-rated health. 

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
Permalink | Comments (0)
 
Community Search
Sign In


Forgot your password?

Haven't registered yet?

CFHA Calendar

12/7/2016
PCBH SIG

1/5/2017
Research and Evaluation Committee Meeting