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MedFT as Flower: Family Caregiving as Forest

Posted By Barry J. Jacobs, Tuesday, September 24, 2013


This is a post in a series of "blasts from the past". These classic posts will highlight issues that are just too important to collect dust in the archives. The series will be off and on for the next several weeks. Enjoy!

(This piece was originally posted on July 24th, 2012)

From that magical moment in the Minnesota hot tub in 1991 when Susan McDaniel, Bill Doherty and Jeri Hepworth coined the term "medical family therapy,” the field has had a slow but steady growth, sending tendrils into curricula for family therapists and other healthcare professionals and blossoming into a dozen or so certificate and degree programs around the country. For this progress, we all should be proud. But MedFT, to me, is like a delicate, hothouse orchid, assiduously watered and trimmed, surrounded by a burgeoning forest of more lush and verdant organic growth. The towering trees nearly blocking out the sun nowadays are the results of a fertile, consumer-initiated movement that took root around the same time as MedFT. That movement—now this country’s chief focus on families and illness--is called "family caregiving.”

Orchids and oaks, you say. Apples and oranges. Family caregiving, you contend, is what devoted family members do for an ill loved one; medical family therapists use systemic expertise to foster that endeavor. But while the term "family caregiving” is used to describe the sacrifices and struggles of over 60 million Americans in their provision of care to ailing relatives and friends each year, it also denotes a multi-disciplinary research, advocacy, and clinical effort with a complex infrastructure of federal, state and local support programs, disease- , relationship- and culture-specific research, and public and private funders and policy mavens.

Orchids and oaks, you say.

Apples and oranges.

All that MedFT is striving to achieve—to better understand how families are buffeted by illness and disability and can continue to develop resiliently—the field of family caregiving has also striven for and has far outgrown us.

Take research, for example. Empirical studies within MedFT are relatively few, are based on small subject groups, and have limited generalizability. In contrast, the research conducted over the past 25 years by psychologists, nurses, social workers, family physicians and others, particularly about dementia caregiving families, has been extensive, broad and deep. The original question those researchers undertook to answer—how family caregivers are affected by caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease—has long been answered with evidence of increased morbidity (insomnia, depression, musculoskeletal problems; see Schulz & Martire, 2004) and mortality (see Schulz & Beach, 1999). These diverse researchers have also largely answered the next question—what kind of supports better help family caregivers cope (see here)—and are now working on how to translate those findings into effective public programs on the state and local levels.

Then there’s advocacy. MedFT academicians and practitioners have attempted and accomplished little in the policy arena. The powerhouse family caregiver consumer groups (e.g., National Family Caregivers Association, National Alliance for Caregiving, Family Caregiver Alliance) and other larger organizations with a strong interest in family caregiving (e.g., AARP, Alzheimer’s Association) have lobbied for and helped push through landmark federal legislation, including the Family and Medical Leave Act (1993), the National Family Caregiver Support Program (2000), and the Lifespan Respite Act (2006). Family caregiver advocates have made sure politicians know that there’s a growing constituency of Baby Boomers who want more monies earmarked for supporting their aging parents. Even in tight budgetary times, those funds have gradually increased.

The family caregiving movement’s clinical efforts might not be recognized by medical family therapists as "clinical” at all. Largely consisting of psychoeducation, screening for depression and anxiety, and providing respite care, the caregiver support programs are not particularly systemic in orientation, tending to focus on the needs of the primary caregiver. (Here’s where we have something to teach them about better harmonizing the interactions among various family members to produce better outcomes for the patient and family.) But given the widespread availability of caregiver support services, covering every county in this country, the family caregiving movement is meeting more of the basic psychological needs of the vast majority of families dealing with illness than MedFT could ever hope to achieve.

So what should all this mean for medical family therapists? A few thoughts:

  • MedFT should make every effort to become part of the family caregiving movement: That movement has been intensively collaborative, drawing on the strengths of a broad range of healthcare, legal and financial disciplines, as well as family members and patients. Yet because medical family therapists have been toiling in a few relatively isolated outposts, most family caregivers and leaders in the family caregiving field have never even heard of MedFT. I believe that the systemic expertise that we have to offer would greatly enhance the current efforts of family caregiving to roll out effective community-based programs.
  • We need to call our research family caregiving studies, not MedFT studies. Our researchers need to publish in the major journals for family caregiving, such as The Gerontologist and Aging and Mental Health. That’s how our work with be more widely recognized, disseminated and implemented.
  • We should be pitching ourselves clinically to the public and to colleagues from other disciplines on primary and specialty healthcare teams as "family caregiving experts,” not medical family therapists. This will better communicate who we are and what we do than the current identity we have. This is, in fact, truth in advertising—we are family caregiving experts!
  • Our MedFT associations—e.g., the CFHA MedFT work group and the MedFT Facebook group—should be advocating for improved services for family caregivers. We should join with dozens of other healthcare professional associations in the large and powerful coalition known as the National Alliance for Caregiving (www.caregiving.org). NAC is the single strongest voice advocating in Congress and in the academies today for the needs of families struggling with illness and disability.

In short, we need to branch out of the insular hothouse world and roam the forest. We need to cross-fertilize with other disciplines more. We need to pollinate their ideas with our own and improve their systemic understanding and efficacy. We have to trust that who we are and what we do will matter--and not just get lost in the scenery.

References

Schulz, R & Martire, L (2004). Family caregiving of persons with dementia: prevalence, health effects and support strategies, Am J Geri Psychiatry, May-June, 12(3), 240-9

Schulz, R & Beach (1999). Caregiving is a risk factor for mortality: the Caregiver Health Effects Study, JAMA, Dec. 15;282(23):2215-9

 


Barry J. Jacobs, Psy.D., Director of Behavioral Sciences for the Crozer-Keystone Family Medicine Residency Program in Springfield, PA, has long been involved in the family caregiving movement. He is the national spokesperson on family caregiving for the American Heart Association and an honorary board member of the Well Spouse Association. Most recently, he was appointed to the Caregiver Advisory Board of AARP. He has long written the advice column for "Take Care,” the newsletter of the National Family Caregivers Association, and is also the author of The Emotional Survival Guide for Caregivers (Guilford, 2006).



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